teaching Overview

Philosophy and Motivation  PDF

I believe that the purpose of economic education is to introduce students to a different way of thinking.  I encourage my students to see and think like an economist by exposing them to new ideas using a variety of teaching methods.  In my classes I emphasize problem solving, critical thinking, and teamwork.

I have applied this philosophy while teaching classes in Managerial Economics, Economic Development of Developing Nations, Transition Economies, Public Choice (all in the Department of Economics), and Personal Finance (in the Business School) at George Mason University. With Professor Thomas Stratmann, a leading applied econometrician in the fields of public choice and law and economics, I have also had the opportunity to co-teach an Econometrics class.  My teaching philosophy influences the structure and content of all my classes, the way I conduct my lectures, and what my students take away from the course, as evidenced by their evaluations and comments.

Through my experience teaching, I have learned that the most effective pedagogy is passion for my subject and approachability.  Energy is infectious and I want to impart my enthusiasm for economics to my students through my own engagement and research in the subject.  I make it a point to learn each student’s name which allows me to address them in a more personal way.  It is important for them to know that I not only care about their academics but that I also care about them as individuals.  College is a time for great personal growth and intellectual development and I feel privileged to be a small part of my students’ experiences at university. 

I received recognition for my outstanding teaching in AY 2014-2015 and AY 2015-2016.

Hear from my students!  Student Testimonials 

View my Rate My Professor page

 

Courses

Moblab's Cornot competition game 

Moblab's Cornot competition game 

Managerial Economics 

This course utilizes the tools of microeconomics to solve managerial decision problems.  We use models of decision making to apply an objective lens to general decision-making in business areas.  The goal of this course is to use analytical techniques and decision-making tools to analyze decision problems that business people and managers face.   Principles of decision making will be introduced and applied to problems in the business world.

This course provides students with a framework of how economics can be used by businesses to compete and meet the needs of their customers more effectively. Students will develop their skills to apply game theory and microeconomics to solve business problems.  They will use the tools of microeconomics to analyze the incentives internal to the firm and the market forces external to the firm.  Each student should be able to apply and integrate relevant economic concepts to guide managerial decision making by the end of this course. 

Summer 2016, ECON 308 Course Evaluations

 
The students debated Bryan Caplan vs. Donald Wittman's views on democracy, voting, and public choice economics, team "Caplan America" won most-spirited team!

The students debated Bryan Caplan vs. Donald Wittman's views on democracy, voting, and public choice economics, team "Caplan America" won most-spirited team!

Public Choice Economics 

This course provides an introduction and survey of Public Choice economics.  This field is also known as rational choice theory, political economy, or the economics of politics.  Public Choice applies the economic way of thinking to “non-market” decision making.  This field applies the economic lens to decision making by individuals or groups of people who are not traditional buyers nor sellers in the context of traditional markets. 

Spring 2016, ECON 410 Course Evaluations

 
The students learned personal finance management by applying the concepts we learned in class to their daily lives.  

The students learned personal finance management by applying the concepts we learned in class to their daily lives.  

The Fall of the Berlin Wall 

The Fall of the Berlin Wall 

 
 
 
Some of my students and I at a CATO Institute lecture in Washington, DC

Some of my students and I at a CATO Institute lecture in Washington, DC

Personal Finance

This course is an introduction to personal finance management.  It is designed to give you practical skills that you can utilize to become financially stable and independent and to maintain financial stability.   

Spring 2016, FNAN 300 Course Evaluations

 

Economies in Transition

This course covers the structural core of basic economic development with respect to economies in transition.  It explores the question of why some countries are rich and others are successful with regards to formerly socialist countries. After the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the countries that were previously part of the Soviet Union have transitioned away from socialism and experienced radically different economic development, some more dramatically than others. The goal of this course is to investigate the question: Why have some countries been more successful in their transition than others?

Fall 2015, ECON 380 Course Evaluations

 

Economic Development of Developing Nations

 

This course covers the structural core of basic economic development, primarily in developing areas.  We look specifically at China, Latin America, and Africa.  We use a variety of analytical methods such as, empirical methods, historical analysis, and case study methods.  This course is designed to get you to think about development from an economic perspective and provide you with analytical tools that you can apply to any worldwide development issue. 

Summer 2015, ECON 360 Course Evaluations